Is It Bribery or Reinforcement? Why Should I Care?

Bribery Vs Positive Reinforcement – Practical, Behavioral Help for Autism

Positive reinforcement is often confused with bribery. But, is it important for parents (especially for those with children on the autism spectrum) to distinguish the difference between bribery and reinforcement. Equally important is the knowledge of HOW to practically use positive reinforcement to help everyday behaviors.

Does This Behavioral Scenario Sound Familiar?

After working all day, cleaning up after your kids, you’ve spent the past hour cooking an amazing meal for your family, and you put it in front of your toddler and tell him to take a bite. He immediately starts to cry and demand chicken nuggets. Thinking quickly, you say “Hey, I’ll make you a deal, you stop crying and I’ll go make you some chicken nuggets.” Your sigh of relief is palpable as the crying stops, and it’s quiet once more. For many parents, this is a common occurrence, and most of us don’t pause to analyze what we may be teaching at that moment. Read more

Expanding Language Through Play_2

How Expanding Language Through Play Helps with ASD

Expanding language through play helps children who may experience delayed or absent speech as one of the core symptoms of autism spectrum disorder (ASD). While some children experience delays in reaching language milestones, others may benefit most from alternative forms of communication, such as sign language or communication via devices.

When language skills do not allow a child on the autism spectrum to effectively communicate their wants and needs, we often see problem behaviors emerge. For this reason, it is crucial to show a child the value of language through reinforcement.

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Develop independent living skills in your child with autism

How to Build Independent Living Skills in Your Child With Autism

Daily, independent living skills or self-care skills are those skills that people use every day to maintain their appearance, health, and hygiene. These small tasks include brushing teeth, showering, chores, and getting dressed. These are arguably some of the most important skills in a person’s repertoire. These skills provide a person with the autonomy to live on their own or with minimal support.

Many of our learners with autism may need extra support to learn these important skills. For some families, caregivers have to complete these tasks for their child, adding to additional stress on the family. By their children with autism learning these skills, stress can be reduced for the caregivers. Read more

Helping Children with Autism Thrive in School

Helping Children with Autism Thrive in School

It seems as if many kids with autism seem to struggle to thrive in school when placed in mainstream classes. Even if they are provided 1:1 attention and tutoring, they still seem to fall behind from the rest of their neurotypical peers.

As a service provider for children with autism, we want to see our clients make progress not only in their behavior but as well in their academic skills. Read more

Autism Social Skills with Club TLC

The Importance of Peer-Based, Social Skills Groups for Autism

Social Skills – This one item should be on the to-do list of any parent who has a child with Autism

Having a child with autism can add a lot to a parent’s list. We know all parents want to do the best they can for their kiddos, and the list of things is seemingly endless. We are also sensitive to the fact that the ‘list’ for families with kiddos on the Autism spectrum, or special abilities/needs, can be twice as endless. From doctor’s appointments, speech, occupational therapy, and nutrition to just typical needs like a haircut. Read more

Trick or Treat Tips & Tricks for Children with Autism

Trick or Treat Safety Tips

Halloween Trick or Treat Tips for Children with Autism

Trick or treat time can be a memorable, fun experience for any child. Our top suggestions for making trick or treating a positive experience for your child with autism involve focusing on SAFETY and STRATEGY. Read more